Itinerary

Upon our arrival in Nepal the capital city Kathmandu, which is one of the historical places where you will find lots of cultural heritage which also comes under the world heritage site. Our Freedom adventures’ staff will receive you from the airport to drop you by hotel. After some rest and fresh up enjoy Thamel Street at night which is the best tourist hub in the town with the view of live music bars, local market and reputed restaurants. There will be briefing in the evening about our trip by the Freedom Adventures and also acknowledgement of any question we ask regarding our upcoming adventure. Overnight at Kathmandu.

After breakfast at 9 a.m., a pre-trip meeting will be held at the hotel. Here you will be introduced to the tour guide and receive a briefing about the trip. You’ll have the opportunity to ask questions about the tour and become acquainted with other participants. Overnight at Kathmandu hotel.rnrn rnrn rnrnPLEASE INFORM US IF YOU WILL BE ARRIVING LATE AND ARE UNABLE TO ATTEND THE PRE-TRIP MEETING.rnrn rnrnAll passengers MUST attend the meeting with:rn

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  1. Passport.
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  3. Four copies of passport-size photo.
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  5. Travel insurance policy.
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  7. Notepad.
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  9. Writing utensil.
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rn rnrnAfter the breakfast and meeting, the sightseeing trip will begin at 9:45 a.m. on both days. We provide a private vehicle and professional tour guide. The sites visited in Kathmandu are:rnrnPashupatinathrnrnNestled 5km east from Kathmandu amidst the lush green banks of the Bagmati River, Pashupatinath is the oldest Hindu temple in Kathmandu. Dedicated to Lord Shiva, this pagoda-style temple is famous for its gilded roof and richly carved silver doors. Visitors can view the temple from the east bank of the Bagmati, as entrance is strictly prohibited to all non-Hindus. Pashupatinath is the center of an annual pilgrimage during the Shivaratri festival, which occurs during late February/early March. Located behind the temple is Arya Ghat, the cremation grounds of the royal family.rnrnBoudhanathrnrnBoudhanath, one of the holiest Buddhist sites in Nepal, is one of the largest stupas in the world.  Rising from an octagonal base studded with spinning prayer wheels, each side of this golden-roofed temple is adorned by a painting of Buddha’s eyes, symbolizing watchfulness. It is believed that this Buddhist stupa was built by King Man Deva at the advice of goddess Mani Jogini. Surrounding the shrine are the houses and monasteries of the Lamas, or Buddhist priests.rnrnBhaktapur Durbar SquarernrnAs you enter the square, a sense of inner harmony will descend upon you. Bhaktapur Durbar Square is a collection of pagoda and shikhara–style temples grouped around a palace famous for its fifty-five windows. The square is known for its rich architecture and the talent of its craftsmen and artists. Main attractions include the Lion Gate, the Golden Gate, the palace, art galleries, and the statue of King Bhupatindra Malla.

Formal briefing at the Ministry of Tourism. The expedition leader will check that everyone’s equipment is in working order. Overnight at Kathmandu hotel.

Final opportunity for last-minute purchases. Overnight at Kathmandu hotel.

Early morning transfer to the Kathmandu International Airport for the hour-long flight to Lhasa. This stunning flight takes us directly across the main Himalayan range, providing magnificent mountain views. After landing at Gonggar Airport and meeting our Tibetan guide, Lhasa is a further two hour drive. The remainder of the day will be left unscheduled for participants to rest and adjust to Lhasa’s higher altitude. Overnight at Lhasa hotel.

We spend today visiting several of Lhasa’s many monasteries in the company of a guide and interpreter. One of these is the Sera Monastery, one of the best-preserved monasteries in Tibet. Several hundred monks live and study within its whitewashed walls and golden roofs. After lunch we’ll visit the Norbulingka, the summer palace of the Dalai Lama, as well as the Jokhang Temple. This temple is possibly the most sacred shrine in Tibet and there is always a procession of devout Tibetans making their way through the complex. Surrounding the Jokhang is the Barkor, a maze of narrow cobbled streets that is the central market of Lhasa. Overnight at Lhasa hotel.

In the morning, we visit spectacular Potala Palace, which dominates the city of Lhasa. The building served as the seat of the Dalai Lama from the 17th century until 1959, and contains numerous grand state rooms and many important chapels. After lunch we visit the Drepung Monastery, founded in the 14th century and once the largest in the world, with a population of around 10,000 monks. These days that figure is down to several hundred, but there is still much at the monastery of interest, especially because it was left relatively unscathed during the Cultural Revolution. Overnight at Lhasa hotel.

Today includes a long drive across the Tibetan plateau. Soon after leaving Lhasa, we reach the banks of the Tsang Po, which becomes the Brahmaputra River when it enters India. There we will visit Tashilhunpo Monastery, built in 1447. This is the residence of the Panchan Lama, the second most influential religious figure in Tibet. Overnight at Shigatse hotel.

As we continue our drive along the Tibetan highway, the northern edge of the Greater Himalaya comes into view, providing a spectacular panorama of peaks, including Mt. Everest. If time allows, we may be able to visit the main town and its hilltop monastery. Overnight at hotel outside Xegar.

This day will be spent as a rest and acclimatization day, in preparation for the high altitude of the Chinese base camp we will reach tomorrow. Participants are advised to avoid overexertion, but a visit to the main town and the gentle hike up to its hilltop monastery (4,200m) are highly recommended.

Today we complete the drive to the Chinese base camp. Leaving Xegar, we turn south along the bumpy track that leads to the road’s end below Cho Oyu. Overnight at tented camp.

This will be an important day of preparation for the trek. Loads will be sorted out and readied for transportation, and the yaks that will carry them will arrive in the afternoon. Overnight at tented camp.

With yaks carrying the expedition’s supplies, we trek up the long valley to the base camp. Three nights will be spent at intermediate camps rising respectively 5,200 m and 5,450 m before continuing to the base camp. The benefit of acclimatization will be greatly appreciated when we finally reach the camp, our home for the duration of the climb. We arrive at the base early on day 15 and spend the afternoon organizing climbing equipment. Overnight at tented camp.

From the base camp we climb along the glacier toward the mountain and Camp 1. Because of the high altitude, this first trip up the Gyabrag Glacier and onto the mountain itself is for familiarizing participants with climbing and their equipment. It provides an excellent opportunity to view the route that will be taken and assess the mountain conditions.rnrn rnrnOnce the expedition leader is happy with the team’s acclimatization, we begin (weather permitting) to climb the mountain in earnest. In order to reach a position from which we can make successful summit bids, Sherpas will make sure that all camp stores and food are taken care of. The expedition leader will check to be sure that everyone is in good health and properly adjusted to the altitude.rnrn rnrnThroughout the climb, the leader will use a method that adjusts team members to the ever-increasing altitudes. This will be achieved by “climbing high and sleeping low,” until each person feels suitably well-adjusted to make the next move up to a higher camp. At each camp, the team will climb high but then return to the lower camp to sleep. Finally, the team will return to the base camp for a prolonged rest of at least four days before moving up to occupy Camp 3 in preparation for the ultimate climb to the top. Mountain camps are situated as follows:rnrnCamp 1 – 6,400mrnrnCamp 1 is at 6,400 meters and five to eight hours from the base camp. The camp is reached by a steep climb from the head of the glacier at 6,100m. From here, the route follows steep scree, which improves as height is gained. Camp 1 is located on a broad shoulder of snow, which leads up to a ridge above the camp.rnrn rnrnCamp 2 – 7,000mrnrnAbove Camp 1, a snow ridge leads to a series of ice cliffs. The way through these involves climbing a steep 50m ice wall at over 6,600m. Although straightforward, this is the hardest climbing on the route, requiring great effort to climb the steep ice at such an altitude. Improved acclimatization and greater familiarity make the prospect of subsequent climbs through the ice cliffs less daunting, but the challenge remains physically strenuous with each journey to Camp 2. Throughout this section, fixed ropes are placed in conjunction with other teams operating on the mountain at the same time. Above the ice cliffs, there are several large crevasses which we make our way around until they finally give way, giving access to Camp 2 at 7,000m. Depending upon the snow conditions, this can be a very demanding day of six to eight hours.rnrn rnrnCamp 3 – 7,400 meters rnrnCamp 3 is at 7,400m and roughly four hours above Camp 2. This camp is located beneath a rock band that cuts off the snow slopes of the upper basin. As we rise above the beautiful Nangpa Gosum peaks, the mountains of Nepal can be seen to the south, and the arid Tibetan plateau to the north. Although the distance to Camp 3 is short and easy, the high altitude makes the path more demanding.rnrn rnrnOnce at Camp 3, we must make every effort to prepare for the following day. This means eating, drinking, and resting. To function effectively on Summit Day, it is vital for climbers to drink as much as possible in order to replenish the calories and fluids lost during the climb. This can be a challenge, because the altitude makes even slight physical work difficult, and the task of boiling water slower than usual.rnrn rnrnSummit DayrnrnSummit Day begins early, as it takes several hours to make breakfast, hydrate properly, and fully prepare equipment before embarking. The camp faces west, so there is plenty of time for preparations before we depart as the sun rises. Once on our way, easily navigable snow and rock ledges lead through the short rock band above the camp. Gradually the angle of the slope relents until we emerge onto the broad windswept back of the mountain. Now it is only a matter of putting one foot in front of the other to slowly gain the towering distant summit of Cho Oyu, overshadowed only by Mt. Everest. The magnificent vista surrounding us as we cross the vast summit plateau toward the peak includes Ama Dablam, Lhotse, Nuptse, Menlugtse, Gyachung Kang and Gaurisankar, as well as the peaks of the Khumbu Himal. We reach the summit five to eight hours after leaving Camp 3.rnrn rnrnFor the descent the same route will be followed, with nights spent at Camp 3 and Camp 1.rnrn rnrnOn day 40 all climbers should be back at the base camp with belongings and equipment. Packing up the base camp is always time consuming, and everyone will need to help ensure that we leave no trace of our passing.rnrn rnrnIf we are successful in completing the climb ahead of schedule, we will leave the base early and head back to Kathmandu. However, past experience has shown that we will need all of the allotted days unless mountain conditions and the acclimatization process go exceptionally well.

After finishing our trek we will descend back to the road-head with yaks carrying our equipment. Our road transport will be waiting for us. Final night spent in tent.

Although the road from Lhasa to Kathmandu is in good condition, we have broken the fourteen hour drive into two days. Overnight in Zhangmu hotel.

Once back in Kathmandu, Freedom Adventures will host an evening barbecue as a chance to celebrate the expedition, say farewell, and thank the Sherpas and team members for their support and friendship throughout the trip. Overnight at Kathmandu hotel.

Time for relaxation and shopping. Once back in Kathmandu, Freedom Adventures will host an evening barbecue as a chance to celebrate the expedition, say farewell, and thank the Sherpas and team members for their support and friendship throughout the trip. Overnight at Kathmandu hotel.

A Freedom Adventures’ airport representative will escort you to Kathmandu International Airport for your flight departure from Nepal.